The Poetry Question

Discovering the Relevance of Words

Shootdogging.

“Alright, guys, to take down the steer, you gotta hook your right elbow around it’s left horn, then quickly grab the left horn and drive it down to your hip. Be aggressive now, be aggressive. Now with your elbow still hooked around the left horn, take your left hand and grab the steer’s snout and thrust it across your shoulder while falling back hard. This will twist the steer’s spine, bringing him down like a sack of potatoes.”

Jared, my shootdogging instructor, shouted these intructions and broke them down to a scitence so a city boy like me would get the clear picture. You’re probably confused, and don’t worry, I was too. But that’s what happens when you choose to volunteer at a rodeo bible camp. Coming from a kid like me who hasn’t even been on a horse or seen any clint eastwood movie besides Grand Torino, I was light years away from my comfort zone.

Originally, it was supposed to be another friend and me dropping off our friend charlie at the camp because he was asked to volunteer because charlie is a rising country star and it fits his scene perfectly. When we get there I run into a guy who strikes up a conversation with me and it turns out that the camp is desperate for volunteers and can already tell what he’s hinting at, and at this point I’m thinking “Heck no.” But the kids at the camp need supervision and it’s always nice to be a mentor and try something new. I decided to swallow my pride and become a volunteer because what’s the worst that could happen? It’s not like I’m a counselor at camp crystal lake. Even though some of the kids had a jason vorhees attitude. It’s all good.

How can you expect to become something magnificent if you can’t be willing to try different things? You can’t just limit your perspectives and stay enclosed in your envolope. Send yourself off to things that you can’t see yourself doing because anything can happen. You might like it, you might hate it, but it’s always worth knowing. Your comfort zone is just a mask made of excuses and uncertainty that hides the beautiful complextion of your unknown talents and interests. We’re carrying garbage bags full of potential, but if you’re too afraid to break out of your shell, it’ll just be trash.

It seems that most the time we get caught up in our “do’s” and “don’t’s” and it’s leading us on a detour from our future. It’s almost like we’re slaves to our circumstances, and the most beneficial thing we could ever do is change them. So don’t be afraid to fight fire, jump off bridges, Eat lima beans, date people your parents wouldn’t approve of. You won’t eat this sandwich with mayo?! Well shoot, do it anyways. You might actaully like it, you ingnorant fool. Do it all respectively, with good amount of good intentions and curiousity. Don’t be afraid.

The week I spent volunteering at rodeo bible camp was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had. I went in there with the mindset of every awful sterotype of cowboys depicted of movies, ranging from brokeback mountain to no country for old men. Those cowboys were some of coolest people I’ve had the honor to meet. You never know what might happen if you just dip your feet in foreign waters. Don’t be so quick to reject unusual offers or embark on weird journeys that you’re not used to. Anything can happen, and I mean anything. Seriously though, wrestling cows is fun.

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This entry was posted on August 16, 2013 by in COMMENTARY.

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